October 22, 2013

Frugal Tip - Heels of Bread

In my family, no one seems to want to eat the heels of bread.  Yes, I am included, unless the heels are still fresh.  What do I do with the heels?  I don’t throw them out!!  I keep a bread bag in the freezer and put the heels of bread in a bread bag until it is full.  I use them up by making French toast, use as bread crumbs in a meat loaf recipe, make homemade croutons, brush with butter and sprinkle with a little bit of garlic for garlic toast, or make grilled cheese sandwiches by buttering the outside and putting the heel towards the cheese slice.  I would make bread pudding, but I am the only one that would eat it.  As a last resort if you run out of bread, you at least have a bag of heels in the freezer to use.  

6 comments:

Practical Parsimony said...

Since I have two hens, I give them the heels of the whole wheat bread. That means I never have any bread to save. I love bread pudding and have no bread in the freezer. Often, I have gotten out the ends when I ran out of bread. Of course, I never get to save bread with hens who love it as a treat.

The Simple Italians said...

That's funny, because in this Italian home the bread heels are the most prized slices! lol!

The Simple Italians said...

That's funny, because in this Italian home the heels are the most prized slices! lol!

Anonymous said...

I actually like the heel of bread but out of habit I throw them away since no one in my family eats them. You have great ideas on how to use them. Time for me to break my habit!

Paula said...

Martha, I just discovered your wonderful blog and will enjoy reading back posts.

I also lost my last job in 2009. I was 57 at the time and that is no age at which to look for work. I had been a full time homemaker for several periods in my life. My husband and I both enjoy life more that way.

I finally decided to quit beating my head against the proverbial wall. There was already plenty for me to do. My husband had had a minor stroke and had Parkinson's Disease. His symptoms were getting serious enough that it was no longer safe for him to work in the factory and he took early retirement. I need to do most of the driving and get him to his appointments. My mother was not well. She recently died and I have to help my brother empty her house and sell it.

I am astounded by how much we have in common. I was also raised by parents who stored plenty of food for hard times, and I have followed their lead all my married life---forty years. When hard times come, it is wonderful to have all the supplies and food that you need.

I volunteer at the local food pantry, and also for distributing the government commodities. The peoples' stories tug at my heart. I never go to a store without buying something for the pantry, and my practice of couponing helps with this.

Sure, we could use more money, but by both being home now, we have less laundry, use so much less gas, aren't wearing out the car as fast, I have more time to cook cheaply, etc.

I wish I could say I'm keeping a perfect house now, but I find that having a retired husband at home all the time makes me a lot less efficient than I was in the times when I was home alone.

I really look forward to reading all that you have written. Sorry for running on and on.......

Paula said...

I just discovered your blog and look forward to reading your back posts. We have so much in common. I also lost my last job in 2009 and was 57 at the time. That is a horrible age to look for work.

My husband and I had always enjoyed the periods when I was a full time homemaker and I decided maybe it wasn't meant for me to work outside the home for the foreseeable future. My husband had had a slight stroke and has Parkinson's Disease. His symptoms had become such that it wasn't safe for him to continue working in a factory and he took early retirement. I need to do most of the driving and get him to all his appointments.

My mother was not well, and has subsequently died. I am helping my brother with clearing and selling her house.

Sure, we could always use more money, but with his social security and pension, and small retirement fund, we have what we need. There are many ways that expenses go down when no one goes to work everyday.

Like you, I was raised by parents who always stored food for hard times, and I've followed their example the forty years we've been married. Those provisions are a real life saver when hard times come.

I volunteer at the local food pantry and also help distribute the government commodities. The peoples' stories tug at my heart. I never go to the store without buying something for the pantry. My couponing habit helps with this.

I wish I could say I now keep a perfect home, but have learned that having a husband home full time makes me less efficient than I was when I had time home alone. But I keep a home my husband likes to be in, and the health department hasn't shut me down yet.

Looking forward to reading all your blog!